Left Overs

Posted by Rhonda Howell on

Saving the Left Overs.

Growing up not rich, but not pitiful, leaves you with a certain perspective of life. The remains of things good enough the first time around need to saved and used up. When things were not so handy and not so guaranteed to be had, you kept left over everything from food to scraps of wood. You would eventually be glad you had gone to the trouble. 

Douglas Fir and Iron Bench

The drops and scraps from the raising of the Forge have all become projects by creative hands. The drops from the timber frame beams were big and chunky. A good start for something artistic. In collaboration with fellow wood workers they have become benches and furniture each unique in design. The last of the pieces had finally dried to the point of some splitting and issues making them unsuitable for certain projects. Time to combine two creative processes and materials for some nice art work.

Rough cut beginnings for an out of the box project at the Forge. Douglas Fir anvils.

The wood is Douglas Fir. Over 100 years old.

The first century of the life of this wood was spent growing large enough to be able to cut massive 18" beams. One large solid piece that would provide support for the building they became.

Douglas Fir Beams over 160 years start a new chapter in life.

The second century was spent as a part of a giant industrial warehouse up north. The passing of an industrial age brought down the structure and salvaged materials made their way to Alabama. The grain is just beautiful when you have the luxury of a good piece to work on. Lots of patches don't look the best when finished so Walter made the decision to cut wooden anvils that could be used as novelty or advertising pieces. The pattern of the grain is still visible under the protective layer of paint and the patching looks more natural. Each anvil is coated in a layer of hand buffed beeswax for both weather protection and to provide a nice satin finish.

 

In process, these anvils are carved from Douglas Fir nearly 200 years old.

wooden anvil carved from century old Douglas Fir

Weighing in at around 10 to 12 pounds each they create an illusion of the real thing and can fool the eye and the person who picks them up thinking they are much heavier! Each wooden anvil has been painted with an exterior finish. We have about a half a dozen of these for purchase. Each one is about 24" long and 12" tall and 5" wide. You can find this limited number of wooden anvils for purchase on our Forged Sculpture Page. https://walterforge.com/products/wooden-anvil-carved-from-centuries-old-wood

These carved pieces are wonderful for advertising or as unique decor for a barn or farmhouse. They can be creatively used as number of functioning pieces like address signs or a base for planters or mailboxes. 

So save those left overs and don't worry about folks who accuse you of hoarding. Some day soon they will see something wonderful and hear, "I made those from left over......."

Made to Last. Made to Pass.

The Blacksmith's Wife


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